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20121202
20121210
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. these are just two recent high- profile court fights over technology patents. but those companies actually use their patents. a cluster of companies make money buying patents, and filing lawsuits to protect them. but here's the thing: suing is all they do with the patents, they don't actually use the technology. sylvia hall reports the practice is getting the attention of regulators. >> reporter: hipmunk is a website that aims to "take the agony out of travel planning." but this year the startup ran into some agony of its own-- it was slapped with a lawsuit claiming the company's technology violated a patent dating back to 1994. etsy.com, a popular marketplace for handmade goods, has also been sued by a different company this year based on a patent from 2005. the companies filing the lawsuits aren't competitors. in fact, they don't even use the patented technologies they own. instead, they make money buying up patents and enforcing them in court. they're called non-practicing entities, but critics call them "patent trolls" and say they hurt innovation. >> when firms want to innovate, it's not
. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem, one that we want to make a dent in. >> reporter: lowering the number of infections is also good for the hospital's financial health. >> it increases length of stay. it doubles the cost of many operations. we're not reimbursed the same way that we used to for hospital-acquired infections. >> reporter: so the hospital tried an experiment. it put cameras at the entrance to patient rooms in its intensive care unit and tallied how many times workers followed hand hygiene procedures. the compliance rate was less than 10%. but once the hospital started posting the results for the shift publicly, the rate skyrocket
technology is changing and regulations have a hard time susie keeping up with it. we see it with high frequency trading for instance and how companies disseminate information using social media getting it out argue me to more people faster than what a traditional press release or sec filing. so we'll have to see how this one plays out. that stock did not move much today on the notice although we did have plenty other movement. let's get going with our market focus here. as we saw the influence of apple that it can have on the broad market really continue today. the jobs data helped the s&p 500 start in the green but the early gains disappeared as apple shares sank. the index was able to climb positive in the afternoon to finish up a 0.03%. trading volume slowed. 605 million on the big board. 1.6 billion on the nasdaq. the materials and financials gained 0.08%. the energy sector was up 0.07%. technology was the big drag, thanks once again to apple. over the past week apple has gone from almost $600 per share to $533, down about 9%. with the sell-off apple is about $8 above its most rec
on everything from the disruptive effect of technology to the acoustics of punching music venues, i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome. >> good to be back here. >> rose: so tell me what this is. >> i mean it is part memoir. >> a bit of memoir stuff, not a lot but a little bit, it is mainly about music, how the context of music finds itself in, affects what the music turns out to be. >> rose: what do you mean by context? >> there is a lot of them. >> right. >> okay. and i didn't set out to write that, i started writing some essays and things and i realized, wow, this is what it is about that it could be the stage, performing on a stage, the fact that you have to do something live performing in front of other people and it could be the acoustics of the live venue, whether it is reverb brandt space like a cathedral r a little club in nashville .. it could be the finances of trying to be a musician, trying to be a composer and make a little of it and that narrows down and defines what you can reasonably do. you can have the same ambitions but they are going t going to k- they ar
them, but as far as economic trading relationships are concerned, material, in exchange for technology, in exchange even for political alliances, i always wondered about that. tavis: made the argument is because free enterprise and colonization sometimes goes hand in hand. in africa and parts of the world under the guise of free enterprise. >> unfortunately, it does not stand the test of argument. if you say it is a free market. then they must leave the african countries to seek the best conditions for their own development. there are similar aspects of chinese policy, backing some very villainess governments, but that does not mean we should repeat. tavis: the u.s. has been guilty of it as well. >> france, england, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took a question. what does africa have today that the rest of the world does not prove >> -- does not? >> some possibilities. some structures of spirituality, and i emphasize that, spirituality which is not aggres
on the nasdaq. the technology sector led the way, up eight tenths of a percent. the consumer discretionary sector added six tenths of a percent. the big tech names in the dow industrials weren't left out. intel had the biggest percentage gain of dow stocks. shares were up 1.6%. c.e.o. paul otellini said intel could manufacture semiconductors for other chipmakers "for the right types of products." so, queue the rumors about intel possibly making chips for apple. cisco systems moved up 1.4%. the move takes shares to their highest price since september. the top tech sector stock was akamai technologies. akamai helps speed up and manage online content and traffic. a new partnership with at&t led to today's rally. shares jumped 10% on heavy volume. analysts say the deal turns at&t from a competitor of akamai's to a customer, eliminating the rival from akamai's business. on the consumer side, starbucks was hot. first, the company said it will pay more taxes in britain in the next two years. yesterday, the company said it will open at least 1,500 new stores in the u.s. over the next five years. s
have the illusion that technology comes from academic theory rather than trial and error. there is this mistake that we make. i call it lecturing birds how to fly. they make a lot of small mistakes and that is how we got here. that is how the uk got there. on the other hand, as countries get rich, they start increasing education. very educated people tend to not like trial and error. productivity drops and the rate of innovation drops. tavis: you mentioned the uk. how does this notion of "antifragile" apply in a place like egypt right now? >> the way i was complaining about egypt before the arab spring. when you suppress political life -- political life loves volatility. switzerland is a perfect place where you have volatility at the municipal level, but nothing of talk. the exact perfect on stable system is like saudi arabia or egypt. egypt before the arab spring, we had no information for 40 years. no information. a system artificially stabilized and you have hidden risks under the surface and you do not know what they are. that is what happened with the arab spring and
and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. its hard to believe, but weve been here before. first, negotiators pledge to work together then they test what the other side is willing to give. then they submit plans they know the other side will reject. and then, only then, a deal is struck. maybe, but not yet. and with every day that passes, congress and the white house edge close to raising taxes, cutting spending and sending the nation back into recession. here are the arguments -- >> the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about, for example
on the idea that technology is the only answer to our military challenges, that we are only going to fight certain kinds of wars in the future. you know, we say we would never fight another counterinsurgency after vietnam but guess what, we did, and as i look back at all of the times we have used military force since vietnam, when it comes to predicting where we will use our military next, we have a perfect record. >> rose: we are always wrong. >> i have never gotten it right, not once. >> rose: why? >> because the world is unpredictable. and so my mantra when i was secretary was, we need a force that is equipped and trained to provide the maximum possible versatility across the broadest possible range of conflict, because we can't predict what the next conflict will be like and, therefore, we have to train and have as much flexibility and versatility as possible. we can't just prepare for one kind of conflict. > >> rose: you also have said, i think on leaving, that i don't want to be secretary of state when you are fighting these kind of ground wars, you know, with increasing budget deman
hospital that's using technology to do just that. and the economic and investment outlook for 2013-- we talk with gary thayer from wells fargo advisors. >> tom: we want to remind you about a special guest on nbr later this week. nbr founding co-anchor paul kangas will join us on thursday night, december 6. we'll talk about the markets, and he'll answer some of your questions. that's this thursday, december 6. you can submit your questions on facebook or twitter at b-i-z-r-p-t. >> susie: it's beginning to look a lot like christmas here at the nyse. just moments ago, the big board held its 89th annual christmas tree lighting. this year's tree is a 45-foot norway spruce, and if history is any guide, it will be one of the most visited holiday landmarks in the city. and tom, the big board's tree is embroiled in a twitter battle for bragging rights as the city's best with another famous tree, the one at rockefeller center.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees
to and from was one of the most unusual parts because they operate using technology that hasn't really been used before. >> rose: i should set this up for the audience at home who hasn't obviously seen the movie. this is a story how they would lead him to pakistan and a story about how they made a decision to go in and either capture or kill osama bin laden. there's are two different stories. >> and there's the story. >> there's a third story when they go in and actually do it. >> two for the price of one. >> rose: talk about the c.i.a. aspect of this. how long did it take them to get on the trail that would lead them somewhere? because we know that after 9/11 i mean they were all kinds of things going on with american national security people to get somebody to give some information as to where osama bin laden was, to get their hands on osama bin laden. >> well, i mean my humble opinion, mark did an extraordinary job of reporting this and then out of the reporting turning this into an incredibly dramatic screen play. i'm the recipient of that trying to transform those pages into a screen
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposin
provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" from washington. america" from washington. the au
on stage with president obama, it wasn't about television ads or whiz bang turnout technologies, it was about fundamental republican ideas versus fundamental democratic ideas. it was about lower taxes or higher taxes less government or more government, more freedom and less freedom. and republican ideals mitt romney carried the day. stevens was a controversial figure throughout the campaign. he drew criticism externally for being too cautious in defining his candidate and internally for being a sometimes divisive and material figure. in august a new republic profiled him as friendship with mitt romney. the article was published under the title the square and the flare. i've known stuart stevens for a long time and i am pleased to have him here at this table this one of his first conversations about the politics 2012, who won, who lost and why. thank you for coming. >> well i can clarify that. we lost. >> rose: but when did you think you were going to lose? >> we're always very realistic about it contrary to some roorts. we thought we had a good chance to win. after the storm i
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody's is going to have
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)